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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

1 edition of An essay on the medical properties of the Digitalis purpurea, or foxglove found in the catalog.

An essay on the medical properties of the Digitalis purpurea, or foxglove

by John Ferriar

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Published by Printed by Sowler and Russell, for Messrs. Cadell and Davies, London in Manchester .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementBy John Ferriar
ContributionsUniversity of Leeds. Library
The Physical Object
Pagination2 p. 1., iv, [3]-66 p ;
Number of Pages66
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26273037M
LC Control Number35031340

  The first paper, published online in January in the Journal of Chromatography A, describes methods for assessing the exact mass and structure of cardiac glycosides, and compares compounds found in Digitalis purpurea and Digitalis lanata. The second study, published online in March in the journal Data in Brief, expands on the first, providing additional data on characteristics of cardiac glycosides . Adding a bold, vertical dimension to perennial flower beds, shade gardens, and cottage gardens, Digitalis purpurea (Common Foxglove) is a stately biennial or short-lived perennial boasting tall, one-sided spires of pendant, tubular, bright rosy-purple flowers, in. long ( cm), with white speckled throats. Blooming from early to midsummer, they rise from a basal rosette of downy, oblong.

Digitalis purpurea is the botanic name for the plant. This plant was brought by European migrants to the United States centuries ago. Digitalis has spotted, tube shaped, purple flowers and can grow to around five feet in height with many hairy, thick, and large leaves at the base of its tall stem. lis consists of the leaves, collected from plants of the second year's growth, of Digitalis purpurea, the Purple Foxglove, a plant of the nat. ord. Scrophularineae, which grows wild in Europe, and is cultivated in this country, often in private gardens, for its beautiful spike of purple flowers, and largely by the Shakers for the drug market.

Digitalis. Digitalis is a specific inhibitor of the pump, and causes membrane depolarization in normal nerves, although it does not penetrate the blood–nerve barrier efficiently. From: Handbook of Clinical Neurophysiology, Related terms: Digoxin; Serum (Blood) Mucus; Digitalis Purpurea; Cardiac Glycosides; Magnesium; Diuretic; Toxicity; Glycosides; Heart Rate.   Digitalis purpurea, known commonly as foxglove, is a flowering plant native to most parts of Europe. It is the original source of the heart medicine digoxin, (also called digitalis or digitalin). Digitalis, during its homeopathic provings slowed the pulse rate of those who took it.


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An essay on the medical properties of the Digitalis purpurea, or foxglove by John Ferriar Download PDF EPUB FB2

An essay on the medical properties of the digitalis purpurea, or foxglove. By John Ferriar, M.D. [Ferriar, John] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press.

In its determination to preserve the century of revolution. Get this from a library. An essay on the medical properties of the Digitalis purpurea, or foxglove. [John Ferriar; Thomas Percival; W Simmons].

An essay on the medical properties An essay on the medical properties of the Digitalis purpurea the Digitalis purpurea, or foxglove Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item.

EMBED. EMBED (for hosted blogs and item tags) Want more. Advanced embedding details, examples, and help. No_Favorite. Get this from a library. An essay on the medical properties of the digitalis purpurea, or foxglove. By John Ferriar, M.D. physician to the Manchester Infirmary, Dispensary, Lunatic.

Medical histories and reflections. by Ferriar, John, ; Ferriar, John, An essay on the medical properties of Digitalis purpurea; Simmons, William, On the use of nitric acid, in the lues venerea; Simmons, William, On the use of the kali purum, as a caustic in hydrophobia.

Next article. in issue. Trends in Pharmacological Sciences July Two hundred years of foxglove therapy Digitalis purpurea THIS YEAR IS THE th anniversary of the publication in of William Withering's famous monograph An account of the foxglove and some of its medical uses, a book which opened an important chapter in pharmacology; the widely used digitalis glycosides are Cited by: Foxglove is the common name for the plant Digitalis purpurea, from which the drug digitalis is obtained.

Foxglove was mentioned in the writings of Welsh physicians in and later by William Withering in a book published in This quotation is taken from Earl Mindell’s Herb Bible. An essay on the medical properties of the digitalis purpurea, or foxglove. Manchester J. Worth Estes, Hall Jackson and the Purple Foxglove.

Medical Practice & Research in Revolutionary America – Withering, W.: An account of the foxglove, and some of its medical uses: With practical remarks on dropsy, and other diseases Cited by:   The use of foxglove Digitalis purpurea in herbal medicine was described long ago by Greek and Roman herbalists but the scientific investigation of its medicinal properties really began with the investigations carried out by the English botanist and physician William Withering ().

Digitalis lanata and Digitalis purpurea of the family Plantaginaceae were grown in Iraq. Digitalis lanata and Digitalis purpurea contains cardiac glycosides, volatile oil, fatty matter, starch. An Essay of the Medical Properties of Digitalis Purpurea or Foxglove, a, Cadell & Davies, London (), p.

ii J Ferriar An Essay of the Medical Properties of Digitalis Purpurea or Foxglove, b, Cadell & Davies, London (), p. 5Cited by:   The foxglove’s medicinal properties came to the attention of modern medical practitioners when the English physician and botanist William Withering published his paper “An Account of the foxglove and some of its medical uses” in In it he summarised the result of extensive clinical trials with extracts from the foxglove, and.

The medical use of digitalis was popularized by a British physician, William Withering, whose book, An Account of the Foxglove, was first published in Withering's book contained as the frontispiece a drawing of the foxglove, or Digitalis purpurea, which has wide leaves with serrated edges and tall spikes bearing elongated bell-like.

of the foxglove and some of its medical uses, a book which opened an important chapter in pharmacology; the widely used digitalis glycosides are still the most potent inotropic substances known.

The 'prima donna' in the history of digitalis is the fox- glove, Digitalis purpurea (Linn6) or 'purple fingers'. The name. An essay on the medical properties of the Digitalis purpurea, or foxglove by John Ferriar 1 edition - first published in It was also boiled and used as an expectorant (Munro).

William Withering in his book “An Account of the Foxglove and some of its Medical Uses” explains that Foxglove Digitalis can be used to treat numerous diseases including; epilepsy, insanity, nephritis calculosa, hydrothorax and dropsy. Related posts: DIGITALIS PURPUREA Therapeutic symptoms of homeopathic remedy Digitalis purpurea, described by E.B.

Nash in his book, Leaders in Homeopathic Therapeutics, published in ; DIGITALIS PURPUREA Homeopathy medicine Digitalis Purpurea from William Boericke's Pocket manual of homoeopathic materia medica, comprising the characteristic and guiding symptoms Author: C.

Hering. Uses of foxglove. Foxglove contains a chemical called digitalis that can be used to treat heart failure and high blood pressure by raising blood flow and increasing the body’s defence mechanisms.

However, the plant is poisonous if consumed directly, and can cause a number of health problems. Percival,Thomas,A note from Dr. Percival to Dr.

Ferriar, on the properties of digitalis.; Simmons,William,Observations on the use of digitalis, in lumbar abscess. Title(s): An essay on the medical properties of the Digitalis purpurea, or foxglove. Figure 1. Digitalis purpurea (Foxglove).In William Withering demonstrated that the leaves of the foxglove plant alleviated certain forms of dropsy (edema), and in John Ferriar ascribed Cited by: 1.

"An essay on the medical properties of the Digitalis purpurea, or foxglove" (p. []) with appendix, was separately published (London, ) Vol. 3 includes "Account of the establishment of fever-wards in Manchester." Contents of the appendix (v.

An Essay on the Medical Properties of the Digitalis Purpurea, or Foxglove. Sowler & Russel, Manchester, 4. Fraser TR. The action and uses of digitalis and its substitutes, with special reference to strophanthus (hispidus?). Br Med J ;–Cited by: 2.An Account of the Foxglove and some of its by William Withering The Project Gutenberg EBook of An Account of the Foxglove and some of its Medical Uses, by William Withering This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.

You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project.